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South Africa Kruger National Park Package

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Duration

9 Nights and 10 Days

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Cancellation

No Cancellation

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Group Size

Unlimited

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Languages

Afrikaans, English

Overview

South Africa, the southernmost country on the African continent, renowned for its varied topography, great natural beauty, and cultural diversity, all of which have made the country a favoured destination for travelers since the legal ending of apartheid (Afrikaans: “apartness,” or racial separation) in 1994.

South Africa’s remoteness—it lies thousands of miles distant from major African cities such as Lagos and Cairo and more than 6,000 miles (10,000 km) away from most of Europe, North America, and eastern Asia, where its major trading partners are located—helped reinforce the official system of apartheid for a large part of the 20th century. With that system, the government, controlled by the minority white population, enforced segregation between government-defined races in housing, education, and virtually all spheres of life, creating in effect three nations: one of whites (consisting of peoples primarily of British and Dutch [Boer] ancestry, who struggled for generations to gain political supremacy, a struggle that reached its violent apex with the South African War of 1899–1902); one of blacks (consisting of such peoples as the San hunter-gatherers of the northwestern desert, the Zulu herders of the eastern plateaus, and the Khoekhoe farmers of the southern Cape regions); and one of “Coloureds” (mixed-race people) and ethnic Asians (Indians, Malays, Filipinos, and Chinese). The apartheid regime was disdained and even vehemently opposed by much of the world community, and by the mid-1980s South Africa found itself among the world’s pariah states, the subject of economic and cultural boycotts that affected almost every aspect of life. During this era the South African poet Mongane Wally Serote remarked,

Eventually forced to confront the untenable nature of ethnic separatism in a multicultural land, the South African government of F.W. de Klerk (1989–94) began to repeal apartheid laws. That process in turn set in motion a transition toward universal suffrage and a true electoral democracy, which culminated in the 1994 election of a government led by the black majority under the leadership of the long-imprisoned dissident Nelson Mandela. As this transition attests, the country has made remarkable progress in establishing social equity in a short period of time.

South Africa has three cities that serve as capitals: Pretoria (executive), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Johannesburg, the largest urban area in the country and a centre of commerce, lies at the heart of the populous Gauteng province. Durban, a port on the Indian Ocean, is a major industrial centre. East London and Port Elizabeth, both of which lie along the country’s southern coast, are important commercial, industrial, and cultural centres.

Climate

Almost the entire country lies within the temperate zone, and extremes of heat and cold are rare. Its location next to a subtropical high-pressure belt of descending air produces stable atmospheric conditions over most of its surface area, and the climate generally is dry.

Because most of the country lies at fairly high elevation, which tempers the influence of latitude, even the tropical and near-tropical northern areas are much cooler than would otherwise be the case. High elevation and lack of the moderating influence of the sea produce large diurnal temperature variations in most inland areas.

The climate is greatly influenced by the oceans that surround the country to the east, south, and west. The temperate cyclones of the southern ocean exercise considerable influence on weather patterns, especially in winter, when their circulation moves northward. The cold northward-flowing Benguela Current not only cools the west coast considerably but also contributes to the dryness and stability of the atmosphere over the western parts of the country, while the warm southward-flowing Mozambique and Agulhas currents keep temperatures higher on the east and southeast coasts. The resultant warmer and less-dense air rises more readily, facilitating the entry of moisture-bearing clouds from the east.

South Africa and the adjoining ocean areas are influenced throughout the year by descending, divergent upper air masses that circulate primarily eastward, generally causing fine weather and low annual precipitation, especially to the west. During winter (June to August), cold polar air moves over the southwestern, southern, and southeastern coastal areas, sometimes reaching the southern interior of the country from the southwest. These polar masses are accompanied by cold fronts as well as by rain and snow. In summer (December to February), the Atlantic high-pressure system settles semipermanently over the southern and western parts of the country. Local heating of the landmass sometimes causes low-pressure conditions to develop, and rain-bearing tropical air masses are drawn in from the Indian Ocean over the northeastern region.

South Africa is generally semiarid; its precipitation is highly variable, and farmers often face water shortages. More than one-fifth of the country is arid and receives less than 8 inches (200 mm) of precipitation annually, while almost half is semiarid and receives between 8 and 24 inches (200 and 600 mm) annually. Only about 6 percent of the country averages more than 40 inches (1,000 mm) per year. The amount of precipitation gradually declines from east to west. Whereas the KwaZulu-Natal coast receives more than 40 inches (1,000 mm) annually and Kimberley approximately 16 inches (400 mm), Alexander Bay on the west coast receives less than 2 inches (50 mm).

Summers are warm to hot, with daytime temperatures generally from 70 to 90 °F (21 to 32 °C). Higher elevations have lower temperatures, while the far northern and northeastern regions and the western plateau and river valleys in the central and southern regions have higher temperatures. At night temperatures fall substantially in the interior—in some places by as much as 30 °F (17 °C)—while on the coast the daily range is much smaller. Winters are mostly cool to cold, with many higher areas often having temperatures below freezing at night but readings of 50 to 70 °F (10 to 21 °C) in the daytime; however, winters are warm on the eastern and southeastern coasts. Temperatures generally decline from east to west: Durban has an annual average temperature of 69 °F (21 °C), while Port Nolloth—at a similar latitude but on the west coast—registers 57 °F (14 °C).

Conservation

The country contains more than a dozen national parks. The largest, Kruger National Park in Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces, is noted for its populations of rhinoceroses, elephants, and buffalo, as well as a variety of other wildlife. Mountain Zebra National Park in Eastern Cape province shelters the endangered mountain zebra; Addo Elephant National Park, also in Eastern Cape, protects more of the elephant population; and Bontebok National Park in Western Cape contains the endangered bontebok (a type of antelope). Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park in KwaZulu-Natal, inscribed as a World Heritage site in 1999, provides a protected environment for the Nile crocodile, a large hippopotamus population, and many species of birds, in addition to other animals. Regulated big-game hunting of elephants, white rhinoceroses, lions, leopards, buffalo, and many types of antelope is allowed in the country during certain months of the year. Grysboks, klipspringers, and red hartebeests (all varieties of antelope), giraffes, black rhinoceroses, pangolins (anteaters), and antbears are specially protected animals that cannot be hunted.

Conservation efforts in Southern Africa have been aided by the creation of transfrontier parks and conservation areas, which link nature reserves and parks in neighbouring countries to create large, international conservation areas that protect biodiversity and allow a wider range of movement for migratory animal populations. One such park is the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, which links Kruger National Park with Mozambique’s Limpopo National Park and Zimbabwe’s Gonarezhou National Park. Another is Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, which links South Africa’s Kalahari Gemsbok National Park with Botswana’s Gemsbok National Park.

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What you will do

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DAY 1 (Arrival Cape Town South Africa)
DAY 1 (Arrival Cape Town South Africa)

Landing in Cape Town International Airport and move to your hotel for check-in. Rest of their evening at relaxation. You can explore the nearby areas. After that, come back to the hotel and have a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 2 (Cape Town)
DAY 2 (Cape Town)

After a lovely breakfast, continue for a beautiful coastal drive through Clifton and Sea Point and later tour passes the Houses of Parliament, the Castle, the SA Museum, and a couple of other authentic sights – District Six, Bo-Kaap, Slave Lodge and completion at the clamoring Greenmarket Square. A cable car ride takes you up the Table Mountain for a stunning view over the city. Visit the Diamond Works Institute where you can watch diamonds being cut and graded. After a lovely day come back to your hotel for a comfortable overnight stay. Optional - You can take a helicopter ride in the morning (extra cost)

DAY 3 (Cape Town)
DAY 3 (Cape Town)

Have a delicious breakfast. Prepare yourself with an entire day Peninsula tour. Travel past Sea Point and Camps Bay, after that the well-known beaches of Clifton and Llandudno towards Hout Bay popular for the seal colony. Drive along the Atlantic Seaboard. Go through Noordhoek and Scarborough. Enjoy the funicular ride onboard the "Flying Dutchman" and enjoy the exceptional fabulous views. Visit the excellent Boulders Beach, and have the option to sit among the famous colony of Jackass Penguins. Come back to the hotel and have a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 4 (Cape Town to Knysna)
DAY 4 (Cape Town to Knysna)

Have a delicious breakfast and check-out from the hotel. Move by road to Garden Route. Check-in to your Hotel and the rest of the day can be spent at relaxation. Relax at your hotel or you can explore nearby areas. After that, come back to the hotel for an overnight stay.

DAY 5 (Knysna - Oudtshoorn)
DAY 5 (Knysna - Oudtshoorn)

Have a wonderful breakfast and head to an entire day visiting in Oudtshoorn. Features of the day are the Cango Caves near Oudtshoorn which are among the greatest stalagmite formation on the planet. One can take broad subterranean strolls in the widely branching caves. Safari Ostrich Show Farm is a working homestead where the visitor will see huge herds of ostriches at various phases of improvement in the surrounding fields. The visit begins in the breeding camp, with a home of ostrich eggs, where the primary phase of the ostrich life cycle is clarified. You will also be visiting Cango Wildlife Ranch and view the rich fauna of the Karoo area. After an amazing day come back to the hotel and have a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 6 (Kruger)
DAY 6 (Kruger)

After a delicious breakfast move to George airport to get onto a trip to Johannesburg (Flights excluded). After arrival, transfer to your hotel and check-in at the hotel which is outside Kruger National Park and go through the day at relaxation or you can decide to go on an afternoon game drive in an open safari vehicle. After that, come back to your hotel for a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 7 (Kruger)
DAY 7 (Kruger)

On this day enjoy an energizing and entire day in the Kruger National Park. Start the early morning with a game drive in an open vehicle. After that come back to your hotel for a delicious breakfast, freshen up and spend some time at relaxation before you head out to enjoy the afternoon game drive again in an open Safari vehicle. After an adventurous day come back to your hotel for a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 8 (Kruger - Johannesburg)
DAY 8 (Kruger - Johannesburg)

Breakfast at the hotel and check out. Proceed to Johannesburg. On arrival Check-in to your hotel and enjoy the rest of the day at leisure. You can relax at the hotel or you can explore nearby areas. After that come back to your hotel and have a comfortable overnight stay.

DAY 9 (Johannesburg)
DAY 9 (Johannesburg)

Have a delicious breakfast. Head to the Lion Park which offers amazing wildlife experience with a wide variety of animals and huge herbivores indigenous to Africa. Some of the animals you will discover at the park are the uncommon white lions, different carnivores, for example, South African cheetah, Cape wild dog, hyena and spotted hyena, black-backed jackal, and a wide variety of antelope like the - blesbok, gnu, impala, gemsbok, and zebra which roam freely in the antelope region separated from the carnivores. After adventurous day come back to the hotel and you can spend the remainder of the day at the gambling club or the Emperor's Palace. Overnight stay at the hotel.

DAY 10 (Departure)
DAY 10 (Departure)

After a delicious breakfast check-out from the hotel, transfer to the Johannesburg International Airport. Catch your flight back home with wonderful memories and amazing experiences.

Included/Exclude

  • Cape Town : Full Day Peninsula tour | Half Day City Tour
  • Johannesburg : Lion Park
  • Kruger National Park : Full Day Kruger National Park Tour
  • Knysna : Safari Ostrich Show Farm Classical Tour | Cango Caves Heritage Tour
  • Airfare & Taxes
  • Visa + Travel Insurance
  • Tips and porterage
  • Surcharges as applicable due to peak season, surcharge dates, trade fair dates.
  • Any services not mentioned in the inclusions list

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